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The 1033 Program

The 1033 Program (formerly the 1208 Program) permits the Secretary of Defense to transfer, without charge, excess U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) personal property (supplies and equipment) to state and local law enforcement agencies (LEAs).

The 1033 Program has allowed law enforcement agencies to acquire vehicles (land, air and sea), weapons, computer equipment, fingerprint equipment, night vision equipment, radios and televisions, first aid equipment, tents and sleeping bags, photographic equipment and more.

Rules and Restrictions

  • The requesting agency must be a government agency that has a primary function of enforcing laws and with officers who are compensated and have powers of arrest and apprehension.

  • The property must be drawn from existing DoD stocks.

  • The receiving agency is responsible for all costs associated with the property after it is transferred, as well as for all shipping or federal repossession costs.

  • The recipient must accept the property on an as-is, where-is basis.

  • All property is transferred on a first-come, first-served basis.

  • Property may not be sold, leased, rented, exchanged, bartered, used to secure a loan, used to supplement the agency's budget or stockpiled for possible future use.

Application Procedures

  • A state or local law enforcement or corrections official begins the process by completing a "Law Enforcement Agency (LEA) Application for Participation in the 1033 Program." This application can be found at the following link: https://www.dispositionservices.dla.mil/rtd03/leso/forms.shtml.

  • After the application is completed, the agency official sends the application to the State Point of Contact (SPOC) for the respective state in which the applicant is located.

  • On approval by the SPOC, the application is sent to the U.S. Department of Defense Law Enforcement Support Office (LESO) in Battle Creek, Mich.

  • The LESO responds by sending a letter to the SPOC, who sends it on to the agency. This letter provides the agency with a unique number allowing the agency to access the LESO database and also identifies the law enforcement officers authorized to screen and receive property at all Defense Reutilization and Marketing Offices (DRMOs). In some states, all screening and acquisition of property is performed at the state level.

How to Find Available Items

There are two methods of screening excess property. The first is physically visiting DRMOs and looking over the excess property displayed. The second method would be reviewing the inventory listings of the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) through their website: https://www.dispositionservices.dla.mil/rtd03/leso/index.shtml.

For instructions on how to navigate the DRMS website, please contact your State Coordinator , call (800) 248-2742, Email asknlectc@justnet.org or contact Charlie Brune, Law Enforcement Project Manager, Federal Excess Property Programs, cell phone (512) 517-8064; Email cbrune@srtbrc.org.

Charlie Brune joined the staff of the Small, Rural, Tribal and Border Regional Center (SRTB-RC) on Sept. 1, 2009, as the law enforcement liaison for the Federal Surplus Property Program. SRTB-RC is one of centers in the National Law Enforcement Corrections and Technology Center (NLECTC) System, a program of the National Institute of Justice. SRTB-RC is a public safety program of The Center for Rural Development (CRD), based out of Somerset, Ky. Before joining NLECTC, Mr. Brune retired from the Texas Department of Public Safety as a captain with the Texas Rangers. Mr. Brune has more than 40 years of experience in state law enforcement involving several different state agencies. He has conducted numerous investigations into public corruption, money laundering, fraud and homicides. Mr. Brune has also served in the U.S. Army, obtaining the rank of staff sergeant. Mr. Brune graduated from Schreiner College in Kerrville, Texas.

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